Is the Dakota Access Pipeline above or below ground?



Is the Dakota Access Pipeline on Public or Private Land?



Are there any other pipelines under Lake Oahe?

There are currently eight other non-DAPL owned pipelines under Lake Oahe, including existing dual 42-inch pipelines that have been uneventfully operating just a few feet below the lake bed since for almost 35 years. By contrast, the Dakota Access Pipeline will be at a minimum depth of 92 feet below the lake bed, and as much as 115 feet below it at certain points.

There is also a high-voltage electrical system running across Lake Oahe.



The Dakota Access pipeline is safe.



Is the Dakota Access Pipeline safe?



Does the Dakota Access Pipeline put the water or land of the Standing Rock Sioux at risk?

At no point does the Dakota Access Pipeline pass through the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, nor does it impact the Tribe’s water supply. The water inlet for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe will be 70 miles away from the pipeline by early 2017, when the tribe’s water intake moves to South Dakota.

Map showing Dakota Access Pipeline going through private land

Today, eight pipelines are already under the Missouri River in North Dakota, safely carrying hundreds of thousands of barrels of crude oil across the river every day without incident.

DAPL will be tunneled 95 to 115 feet beneath the bottom of Lake Oahe at the Missouri River, much deeper than the other pipelines. The pipeline never comes in contact with the lake or river.



What is the Dakota Access Pipeline?



What is the benefit of the Dakota Access Pipeline?



Where does the Dakota Access Pipeline run?



What was the Legal Approval Process for the Dakota Access Pipeline?



What is Bakken shale oil, and how does it relate to the Dakota Access Pipeline?

The Bakken formation is a massive rock unit of about 200,000 square miles in North Dakota, Montana, and Saskatchewan, Canada. This region contains billions of barrels of oil and is the site of one of the largest oil developments in U.S. history.

Hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil are produced in the region daily, then transported by truck or rail to refineries throughout the United States.

The state-of-the-art, environmentally safe Dakota Access Pipeline will greatly reduce the need for rail and truck transportation of Bakken-produced crude oil. Pipelines are a safer method of transporting oil than trucks or rail as shown by numerous studies.

 



Who is Energy Transfer Partners?

Energy Transfer Partners is the nation’s most experienced pipeline company. It has one of the best safety records in the oil transportation industry.

Energy Transfer has installed thousands of miles of pipeline throughout the United States. It is the largest pipeline company in the United States by annual volume transported and the second largest U.S. pipeline company by miles of infrastructure.



What was the regulatory process for approving the Dakota Access Pipeline?



How is the Dakota Access Pipeline constructed?



Does the Dakota Access Pipeline put the water or land of the Standing Rock Sioux at risk?

At no point does the Dakota Access Pipeline pass through the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, nor does it impact the Tribe’s water supply. The water inlet for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe will be 70 miles away from the pipeline by early 2017, when the tribe’s water intake moves to South Dakota.

Map showing Dakota Access Pipeline going through private land

Today, eight pipelines are already under the Missouri River in North Dakota, safely carrying hundreds of thousands of barrels of crude oil across the river every day without incident.

DAPL will be tunneled 95 to 115 feet beneath the bottom of Lake Oahe at the Missouri River, much deeper than the other pipelines. The pipeline never comes in contact with the lake or river.



What if there is an earthquake or wildfire near the Dakota Access Pipeline?



How long is the Dakota Access Pipeline, and where does it travel?



How was the route of the Dakota Access Pipeline determined?



What approvals were needed of the route for the Dakota Access Pipeline?



How much of the Dakota Access Pipeline is complete?

Construction is complete. Dakota Access Pipeline began commercial service June 1, 2017, transporting crude oil from the Bakken/Three Forks production areas in North Dakota to a storage and terminalling hub outside Pakota, Illinois.



Why are the Standing Rock Sioux objecting to the route of the Dakota Access Pipeline?

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have raised several reasons why they are opposed to the project. The most recent argument is that it threatens their water supply and, potentially, their sacred sites.

However, the Dakota Access Pipeline does not enter even one inch of the Standing Rock reservation and does not pose a threat to their water supply. In fact, by early 2017, the pipeline will be about 70 miles away from the inlet that is used as a source of water for the Tribe. And there have been extensive studies that have concluded that the pipeline project will not impact any sacred sites.

Moreover, rail cars, the existing method of transportation for Bakken crude, already crosses the Missouri River, which feeds Lake Oahe, and are statistically less safe.



Is the Dakota Access Pipeline on land belonging to the Standing Rock Sioux?

No. There is no part of the pipeline that crosses or enters the Standing Rock Reservation.

The part of the project that crosses underneath Lake Oahe – not Standing Rock land – is owned by the United States Government. This part of the pipeline will be tunneled using state of the Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) through soil nearly 100 feet below the bottom of the lake. This is about 20 times deeper than an existing pipeline that was installed beneath the same lake in 1982 and has operated safely for about 35 years.

In fact, 8 pipelines in total currently pass below Lake Oahe today, as well as one high-energy power system.



Are there any other pipelines under Lake Oahe?

There are currently eight other non-DAPL owned pipelines under Lake Oahe, including existing dual 42-inch pipelines that have been uneventfully operating just a few feet below the lake bed since for almost 35 years. By contrast, the Dakota Access Pipeline will be at a minimum depth of 92 feet below the lake bed, and as much as 115 feet below it at certain points.

There is also a high-voltage electrical system running across Lake Oahe.



The Dakota Access pipeline is not built on Native American reservations.



The area of the Dakota Access pipeline in question has held another pipeline for over 30 years.



The builders of the Dakota Access pipeline adhered to all federal, state, and local laws and regulations.



Most of the protesters at the Dakota Access Pipeline are not Standing Rock Sioux.



Tribes were consulted hundreds of times while DAPL route was planned

In developing the route, the United States Army Corps of Engineers had hundreds of contacts with dozens of tribes while the Dakota Access project was reviewed. In addition, the U.S. Army Corps reached out to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe nearly a dozen times to discuss archaeological and other surveys conducted before finalizing the Dakota Access route.

Page 40 of the USACE Brief dated 8-18-16.


No Native American artifacts were disturbed during construction.

In a memo, dated September 22, 2016, Paul R. Picha, the Chief Archaeologist of the State Historical Society of North Dakota wrote:

 

In conclusion, the cultural resources inventory and inspection conducted and reported herein yielded no evidence of infractions to or violations of North Dakota Century Code § 23..06-27 with respect to disturbance of human remains or significant sites.

 

Read entire memo here.

North Dakota Historical Society Memo


The source of water for the Standing Rock Sioux is not near the Dakota Access Pipeline.



The Dakota Access Pipeline does not cross land owned by the Standing Rock Sioux.



The Dakota Access Pipeline is an underground pipeline.

The Dakota Access Pipeline is an entirely underground pipeline. Only where there are pump stations or valves of testing stations is there any portion of the pipeline above ground.

The pipeline is buried nearly 4 feet deep in most areas and in all agricultural lands, two feet deeper than required by law. The pipeline will cross at least 95 feet, and at points, up to 115 feet, below the bottom of Lake Oahe.



How many permits and regulatory inspections has the Dakota Access Pipeline been subject?



Who approved the design and route of the Dakota Access Pipeline?



What roles does the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers play in the Dakota Access Pipeline?



Have the protests at the Dakota Access Pipeline site been peaceful?

Unfortunately, some of the protesters chose to attack police officers and pipeline workers, set fires, and vandalize equipment. Hundreds of these protesters were arrested during the protests.

Two law enforcement agencies asked for additional federal assistance in handling the violent protests. Over 300 protesters have been arrested in connection with these protests.



Who stands to benefit from the protests at the Dakota Access Pipeline Site?



How does law enforcement feel about the protests at the Dakota Access pipeline site?

Local law enforcement has urged protesters to refrain from violence, comply with the law, and go home for their own safety. They have asked federal officials for resources needed to deal with violent and dangerous protesters who have become a threat to peaceful demonstrators, the public and law enforcement.



What has local media reported about the protests at the Dakota Access pipeline site?

Local news media reported that protesters attacked police, set fires, and vandalized equipment causing extensive damage and creating a threat to public safety.

For dozens of news articles and op-eds, please click here to visit our News section.